Tag Archives: children with incarcerated parents

Newsletter – September, 2018

CCT News

CCT’s Center for Women Celebrates 30 YearsEvelyn Hill, former resident, speaks about her time at CCT and the changes she's made in her life

On September 6th, The Center for Community Transitions (CCT)’s Center for Women celebrated its 30th anniversary of operation and was joined by elected officials and other dignitaries for cake and powerful testimonies from employers and former residents.

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You Helped Children with Incarcerated Parents go Back to School In Style!

CCT held it’s annual Back In Style event on Thursday, August 23rd. The annual back to school event helps children with incarcerated parents prepare for the new school year by providing school supplies, school uniforms, and free haircuts and hair styles.

Shop Amazon and Give Back to CCT

When you shop with Amazon, you can help support CCT at the same time. And, better yet—it won’t cost you a thing! AmazonSmile is a website operated by Amazon that lets customers enjoy the same wide selection of products, low prices, and convenient shopping features as on Amazon.com. The difference is that when you shop on AmazonSmile, the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the price of eligible purchases to CCT.   Start supporting CCT today!

At CCT we rely on generous donors like you to provide the resources we need. Thank you to everyone who donated in the month of August.

Foundations/Corporations
Anonymous Family Foundation
Carolina Industrial Trucks
James L. Ross Scholarship Fund
Mecklenburg  ABC Board
Sally Jordan Family Fund
United Way of Central Carolinas
Wells Fargo Government and Community
Relations

Faith Community
Arlington Baptist Church
Charlotte Friends Meeting
Covenant Presbyterian Church
Elevation Church
St. Luke’s Lutheran Church

Individuals
Anonymous
Robert F. Colwell
Betty Hong
Janine Lafferty
Fred Lowrance
Beth Wells


Volunteer Opportunities

For a full list of ongoing volunteer opportunities visit our Volunteer Page.
Event Volunteering

If interested contact Adair Hill at communications@centerforcommunitytransitions.org

Event Photographer: Sunday, September 30, 2018 – 2:45pm – Do you have a gift for photography? Are you looking to build your photography portfolio? We are seeking a volunteer to come take photographs at our Women’s Education Tea on September 30th. The event is to raise funds for our Women’s Education Fund which provides financial assistance to incarcerated women pursuing higher education.


Upcoming Events

Benefit Tea for the Center for Women Education Fund

September 30 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
The Center for Women – 5825 Old Concord Rd. Charlotte, NC
Free – But be prepared to make a donation!
Please RSVP to communications@centerforcommunitytransitions.org or 704-389-0319

Each year, some incarcerated women living at the Center for Women choose to advance their education and CCT strives to cover the costs of classes, books, and materials. Join us for tea and sweets and hear from Center for Women alumnae about their educational experiences.

Find out more »


Employer Appreciation Breakfast

January 29, 2019 @ 7:30 am
Sandwich Sam, 1601 South Blvd
Charlotte, NC 28203
Free

Employment is one of the most important elements in successful reentry, and our clients could not find gainful employment without employers who are aware of the benefits of hiring people with criminal records and willing to do so. With this event, we say “thank you” to those employers, and welcome new employers interested in learning about hiring people with criminal records.

Find out more »

 

CCT Program Reports Released

Each year, CCT compiles an Annual Report to provide an overview of our finances and accomplishments to our stakeholders. In Fiscal Year 2017, CCT released more detailed individual program reports. You can read them below.

  

Build People, Not Prisons

The purpose of this friend-raiser is to garner community support and raise awareness about the needs of people reentering the Charlotte community from jail or prison, and the needs of Charlotte children experiencing parental incarceration.

This evening will feature a special guest performance by Playing For Others teens of their spoken word piece, “Build People, Not Prisons” and the premier of CCT’s newest video, developed by Basic Cable. You’ll also enjoy live music, appetizers from Ink N Ivy, beer and wine.

Early bird tickets may be purchased before March 9th for $20. Regularly priced tickets are $25. Tickets include admission, appetizers, desserts, and drinks.

All proceeds from the event will benefit CCT’s three core programs serving Charlotteans impacted by incarceration.

Join us to mingle, learn, and build people, not prisons.

MARCH 22, 2018 @ 5:00PM — 7:00PM

Purchase your tickets here.

This Event Is Proudly Sponsored By:

Carolina Industrial Trucks

Freedom Mobility Center

SUM Bucha

CCT Executive Director Participates in City-Wide Panel

Last night CCT Executive Director, Myra Clark, participated in a panel at a city-wide event about mass incarceration. The event, “Rethinking Incarceration” was hosted by Warehouse 242 and featured a new book by the same name, authored by Dominique DuBois Gilliard. Mr. Gilliard was the keynote speaker and also served on the panel. The other panel members were Toussaint Romain, Ramona Brandt, and Councilman Braxton Winston

More than 300 people attended the event and discussed topics ranging from the huge racial disparities in our criminal justice system, to the need for affordable housing and jobs for people with criminal records, to the impact of mass incarceration on children and families.

The event was a wonderful start to a much needed ongoing conversation in Charlotte. Creative Loafing did a lengthy story that is worth a read if you would like to learn more:

Imagine being sentenced to four years in prison just for stealing clamps.

It’s a case that will stick with Toussaint Romain for years to come, and has only gone to further his belief that, as he told me during a recent chat, “There is no justice in the criminal justice system.”

Romain, a public defender in Mecklenburg County who represents repeat offenders and habitual felons, was telling me about a client he represented last year named Charles. He had been caught at Lowe’s shoplifting metal hand clamps. When he was searched, he was found to also be concealing a package of fish he had stolen from BI-LO. Because he was a repeat offender, he was charged with a felony in relation to the shoplifting incident, and because he had previous felonies on his record, he was stamped as a habitual felon and faced 15 years in prison.

When Romain asked Charles why he was stealing when he knew his record meant he could be facing harsh punishment, his answer was heartbreaking.

“He said, ‘Listen, I’ll tell you. I stole the clamps so that when I put a fish on my metal rod, and I put the clamps on my fish, when I turn the rod over my campfire, the fish will cook evenly. Because I’m homeless. I learned how to do this when I was in the military,'” Romain recalled.

<Read the full article here>